Biodiversity Institute from Maine was asked by the DCR to research loons at Quabbin. As I had been involved since the 80's with loons I was asked to work with them. These photos are from that and hours of just watching loons..

Biodiversity Institute from Maine was asked by the DCR to research loons at Quabbin. As I had been involved since the 80's with loons I was asked to work with them. These photos are from that and hours of just watching loons..

  You can see in this photo the colored leg bands on the loon that we used to identify the loons each year on their territories.

You can see in this photo the colored leg bands on the loon that we used to identify the loons each year on their territories.

Loons have nested at Quabbin since 1976 and the Quabbin is the furthest point south they nest in the Northeastern US.
Loons have nested at Quabbin since 1976 and the Quabbin is the furthest point south they nest in the Northeastern US.
It was thought they mate for life but research at the Quabbin shows they do change partners. They use the same territory each year and raise one or two chicks.
It was thought they mate for life but research at the Quabbin shows they do change partners. They use the same territory each year and raise one or two chicks.
 Whitey
Whitey

This loon we call "Whitey" because of the white patch of feathers on his head. He has been at Quabbin at least the last two years and switched mates and territories. I saw him on April 28th of 2015 back already for a third year.

The DCR helps the loons with these floating nesting islands.  They are anchored and go up and down with the water level and thus the eggs will not be eaten by predators or bothered by water levels.
The DCR helps the loons with these floating nesting islands. They are anchored and go up and down with the water level and thus the eggs will not be eaten by predators or bothered by water levels.
  Moms breakfast !   A common loons chick thats about 4 weeks old get fish for breakfast at the Quabbin Reservoir.  7/10/16

Moms breakfast !   A common loons chick thats about 4 weeks old get fish for breakfast at the Quabbin Reservoir.  7/10/16

Loons are great parents and very protective. The chicks hatch in 26 days. They protect the chicks until they leave for the coast in early winter. These chicks are about 3 weeks old.
Loons are great parents and very protective. The chicks hatch in 26 days. They protect the chicks until they leave for the coast in early winter. These chicks are about 3 weeks old.
  The chicks are in the water within 4 to 5 hours of hatching and never return to the nest. Loons spend most of their life in the water. Exiting only to nest and fly.

The chicks are in the water within 4 to 5 hours of hatching and never return to the nest. Loons spend most of their life in the water. Exiting only to nest and fly.

Here is a ten week old loon and its parent.
Here is a ten week old loon and its parent.
Dinner is served…...
Dinner is served…...
  Loons feed on fish, insects, insect larvae and small crustaceans.  Here is a young loon with a prize crayfish. I watched him shake and smack it on the water until it broke into pieces.

Loons feed on fish, insects, insect larvae and small crustaceans.  Here is a young loon with a prize crayfish. I watched him shake and smack it on the water until it broke into pieces.

This loon is 4 month old.
This loon is 4 month old.
Loons are strong flyers and can fly at speeds up to 75 MPH. They flap their wings 260 times per minute to stay aloft. Loons can fly 2,000 miles during migration.
Loons are strong flyers and can fly at speeds up to 75 MPH. They flap their wings 260 times per minute to stay aloft. Loons can fly 2,000 miles during migration.
 I watched this loon for 5 months until it left the Quabbin for the coast. I was able to photograph it learning to fly and finally going long distances.
I watched this loon for 5 months until it left the Quabbin for the coast. I was able to photograph it learning to fly and finally going long distances.
They start to fly small distances at about 12 weeks old.
They start to fly small distances at about 12 weeks old.
Weeee,  look at me I'm flying !!
Weeee, look at me I'm flying !!
The young loon is ready to travel. Its about 5 months old at this stage.
The young loon is ready to travel. Its about 5 months old at this stage.
  Today we started the weekly common loon surveys by boat on the Quabbin Reservoir conducted by the Biodiversity Research Institute and the DCR. I was asked to help out each year as I have been doing this starting in 1985.... I was glad to help out....5/19/15

Today we started the weekly common loon surveys by boat on the Quabbin Reservoir conducted by the Biodiversity Research Institute and the DCR. I was asked to help out each year as I have been doing this starting in 1985.... I was glad to help out....5/19/15

Loons yodel while they fly sometimes.
Loons yodel while they fly sometimes.
  A Quabbin loon shaking off after a dive.....  5/19/15

A Quabbin loon shaking off after a dive.....  5/19/15

  Here is a loon in the process of taking off.

Here is a loon in the process of taking off.

On Golden Quabbin.   I caught this loon preening in the early morning sun in the fall.  I used no embellishments for this photo. Its all the natural light of the early morning sun.
On Golden Quabbin. I caught this loon preening in the early morning sun in the fall. I used no embellishments for this photo. Its all the natural light of the early morning sun.
Do you know what this loon is doing ?  See the next photo to find out.
Do you know what this loon is doing ? See the next photo to find out.
  I happen to be in a boat doing the weekly common loon survey on The Quabbin Reservoir when one popped up right beside us as we were sitting still with the motor off in the research boat.  I love these birds !  6/30/16

I happen to be in a boat doing the weekly common loon survey on The Quabbin Reservoir when one popped up right beside us as we were sitting still with the motor off in the research boat.  I love these birds !  6/30/16

Its taking a bath !  No kidding !
Its taking a bath ! No kidding !
  We found a red-throated loon on the Quabbin this morning during the weekly loon survey.  They are rare summer visitors at Quabbin and  smaller than the common loons we have nesting here.  6/30/16

We found a red-throated loon on the Quabbin this morning during the weekly loon survey.  They are rare summer visitors at Quabbin and  smaller than the common loons we have nesting here.  6/30/16

   At the end of the year the adult loons head for the coast to spend the winter. The chicks go for 2 years and then come back to the same area they were raised in but some come back after a year. Loons can live in salt and fresh water.

 At the end of the year the adult loons head for the coast to spend the winter. The chicks go for 2 years and then come back to the same area they were raised in but some come back after a year. Loons can live in salt and fresh water.

  An adult loon with the light gree leg band used to identify the individual loons on the Quabbin Reservoir.

An adult loon with the light gree leg band used to identify the individual loons on the Quabbin Reservoir.

Quabbin has about 12 to 14 pairs of nesting loons. It varies from year to year.
Quabbin has about 12 to 14 pairs of nesting loons. It varies from year to year.
Loons still on the Quabbin.
Loons still on the Quabbin.

Here are a couple of loons that haven't left for the ocean yet. Loons have the ability to live on both fresh and salt waters. Usually the adults leave in early December for the coast and the 6 month old chicks leave soon after.  These 2 evidently did get the memo!  1/15/16

  I personally make sure every loon raft is comfortable for our nesting loons the coming summer. Its a tough job and takes a tough man to complete the checklist of demands the loons require for a full nesting season. We launch about 8 rafts at Quabbin each year.  Here I am in action in my breeding plumage testing one of the loon rafts last Friday.  :)   

I personally make sure every loon raft is comfortable for our nesting loons the coming summer. Its a tough job and takes a tough man to complete the checklist of demands the loons require for a full nesting season. We launch about 8 rafts at Quabbin each year.  Here I am in action in my breeding plumage testing one of the loon rafts last Friday.  :)   

  The common loons are getting settled in to their territories and flying about. Here is a banded pair of loons.  You can see the research bands on each loon on their 2 legs. From thse bands we gain lots of knowledge about their past including where they nest at Quabbin. 4/20/16

The common loons are getting settled in to their territories and flying about. Here is a banded pair of loons.  You can see the research bands on each loon on their 2 legs. From thse bands we gain lots of knowledge about their past including where they nest at Quabbin. 4/20/16

  The Quabbin loon population is coming back to their territories and will be mating in early May. Last year was a record year with 16 loon chicks successfully fledging and making it until September 1st. This was taken this morning on April 19th, 2016.

The Quabbin loon population is coming back to their territories and will be mating in early May. Last year was a record year with 16 loon chicks successfully fledging and making it until September 1st. This was taken this morning on April 19th, 2016.

  Today I found both of the Prescott Brook loons on their territory at the Quabbin Reservoir ready for the summer chick rearing season.  Very seldom does this pair of loons successfully raise any chicks.  4/28/16

Today I found both of the Prescott Brook loons on their territory at the Quabbin Reservoir ready for the summer chick rearing season.  Very seldom does this pair of loons successfully raise any chicks.  4/28/16

  Here is a sight that you wont see very often.  Loons out of water!  Loons spend 99% of their life in water.  Today I saw this pair of loons mating on this small island.  The other time on land is setting on the nest.  Note the research bands on the leg of the loon on the left.  5/5/16

Here is a sight that you wont see very often.  Loons out of water!  Loons spend 99% of their life in water.  Today I saw this pair of loons mating on this small island.  The other time on land is setting on the nest.  Note the research bands on the leg of the loon on the left.  5/5/16

  Biodiversity Institute from Maine was asked by the DCR to research loons at Quabbin. As I had been involved since the 80's with loons I was asked to work with them. These photos are from that and hours of just watching loons..
  You can see in this photo the colored leg bands on the loon that we used to identify the loons each year on their territories.
Loons have nested at Quabbin since 1976 and the Quabbin is the furthest point south they nest in the Northeastern US.
It was thought they mate for life but research at the Quabbin shows they do change partners. They use the same territory each year and raise one or two chicks.
 Whitey
The DCR helps the loons with these floating nesting islands.  They are anchored and go up and down with the water level and thus the eggs will not be eaten by predators or bothered by water levels.
  Moms breakfast !   A common loons chick thats about 4 weeks old get fish for breakfast at the Quabbin Reservoir.  7/10/16
Loons are great parents and very protective. The chicks hatch in 26 days. They protect the chicks until they leave for the coast in early winter. These chicks are about 3 weeks old.
  The chicks are in the water within 4 to 5 hours of hatching and never return to the nest. Loons spend most of their life in the water. Exiting only to nest and fly.
Here is a ten week old loon and its parent.
Dinner is served…...
  Loons feed on fish, insects, insect larvae and small crustaceans.  Here is a young loon with a prize crayfish. I watched him shake and smack it on the water until it broke into pieces.
This loon is 4 month old.
Loons are strong flyers and can fly at speeds up to 75 MPH. They flap their wings 260 times per minute to stay aloft. Loons can fly 2,000 miles during migration.
 I watched this loon for 5 months until it left the Quabbin for the coast. I was able to photograph it learning to fly and finally going long distances.
They start to fly small distances at about 12 weeks old.
Weeee,  look at me I'm flying !!
The young loon is ready to travel. Its about 5 months old at this stage.
  Today we started the weekly common loon surveys by boat on the Quabbin Reservoir conducted by the Biodiversity Research Institute and the DCR. I was asked to help out each year as I have been doing this starting in 1985.... I was glad to help out....5/19/15
Loons yodel while they fly sometimes.
  A Quabbin loon shaking off after a dive.....  5/19/15
  Here is a loon in the process of taking off.
On Golden Quabbin.   I caught this loon preening in the early morning sun in the fall.  I used no embellishments for this photo. Its all the natural light of the early morning sun.
Do you know what this loon is doing ?  See the next photo to find out.
  I happen to be in a boat doing the weekly common loon survey on The Quabbin Reservoir when one popped up right beside us as we were sitting still with the motor off in the research boat.  I love these birds !  6/30/16
Its taking a bath !  No kidding !
  We found a red-throated loon on the Quabbin this morning during the weekly loon survey.  They are rare summer visitors at Quabbin and  smaller than the common loons we have nesting here.  6/30/16
   At the end of the year the adult loons head for the coast to spend the winter. The chicks go for 2 years and then come back to the same area they were raised in but some come back after a year. Loons can live in salt and fresh water.
  An adult loon with the light gree leg band used to identify the individual loons on the Quabbin Reservoir.
Quabbin has about 12 to 14 pairs of nesting loons. It varies from year to year.
Loons still on the Quabbin.
  I personally make sure every loon raft is comfortable for our nesting loons the coming summer. Its a tough job and takes a tough man to complete the checklist of demands the loons require for a full nesting season. We launch about 8 rafts at Quabbin each year.  Here I am in action in my breeding plumage testing one of the loon rafts last Friday.  :)   
  The common loons are getting settled in to their territories and flying about. Here is a banded pair of loons.  You can see the research bands on each loon on their 2 legs. From thse bands we gain lots of knowledge about their past including where they nest at Quabbin. 4/20/16
  The Quabbin loon population is coming back to their territories and will be mating in early May. Last year was a record year with 16 loon chicks successfully fledging and making it until September 1st. This was taken this morning on April 19th, 2016.
  Today I found both of the Prescott Brook loons on their territory at the Quabbin Reservoir ready for the summer chick rearing season.  Very seldom does this pair of loons successfully raise any chicks.  4/28/16
  Here is a sight that you wont see very often.  Loons out of water!  Loons spend 99% of their life in water.  Today I saw this pair of loons mating on this small island.  The other time on land is setting on the nest.  Note the research bands on the leg of the loon on the left.  5/5/16

Biodiversity Institute from Maine was asked by the DCR to research loons at Quabbin. As I had been involved since the 80's with loons I was asked to work with them. These photos are from that and hours of just watching loons..

You can see in this photo the colored leg bands on the loon that we used to identify the loons each year on their territories.

Loons have nested at Quabbin since 1976 and the Quabbin is the furthest point south they nest in the Northeastern US.
It was thought they mate for life but research at the Quabbin shows they do change partners. They use the same territory each year and raise one or two chicks.
Whitey

This loon we call "Whitey" because of the white patch of feathers on his head. He has been at Quabbin at least the last two years and switched mates and territories. I saw him on April 28th of 2015 back already for a third year.

The DCR helps the loons with these floating nesting islands. They are anchored and go up and down with the water level and thus the eggs will not be eaten by predators or bothered by water levels.

Moms breakfast !   A common loons chick thats about 4 weeks old get fish for breakfast at the Quabbin Reservoir.  7/10/16

Loons are great parents and very protective. The chicks hatch in 26 days. They protect the chicks until they leave for the coast in early winter. These chicks are about 3 weeks old.

The chicks are in the water within 4 to 5 hours of hatching and never return to the nest. Loons spend most of their life in the water. Exiting only to nest and fly.

Here is a ten week old loon and its parent.
Dinner is served…...

Loons feed on fish, insects, insect larvae and small crustaceans.  Here is a young loon with a prize crayfish. I watched him shake and smack it on the water until it broke into pieces.

This loon is 4 month old.
Loons are strong flyers and can fly at speeds up to 75 MPH. They flap their wings 260 times per minute to stay aloft. Loons can fly 2,000 miles during migration.
I watched this loon for 5 months until it left the Quabbin for the coast. I was able to photograph it learning to fly and finally going long distances.
They start to fly small distances at about 12 weeks old.
Weeee, look at me I'm flying !!
The young loon is ready to travel. Its about 5 months old at this stage.

Today we started the weekly common loon surveys by boat on the Quabbin Reservoir conducted by the Biodiversity Research Institute and the DCR. I was asked to help out each year as I have been doing this starting in 1985.... I was glad to help out....5/19/15

Loons yodel while they fly sometimes.

A Quabbin loon shaking off after a dive.....  5/19/15

Here is a loon in the process of taking off.

On Golden Quabbin. I caught this loon preening in the early morning sun in the fall. I used no embellishments for this photo. Its all the natural light of the early morning sun.
Do you know what this loon is doing ? See the next photo to find out.

I happen to be in a boat doing the weekly common loon survey on The Quabbin Reservoir when one popped up right beside us as we were sitting still with the motor off in the research boat.  I love these birds !  6/30/16

Its taking a bath ! No kidding !

We found a red-throated loon on the Quabbin this morning during the weekly loon survey.  They are rare summer visitors at Quabbin and  smaller than the common loons we have nesting here.  6/30/16

 At the end of the year the adult loons head for the coast to spend the winter. The chicks go for 2 years and then come back to the same area they were raised in but some come back after a year. Loons can live in salt and fresh water.

An adult loon with the light gree leg band used to identify the individual loons on the Quabbin Reservoir.

Quabbin has about 12 to 14 pairs of nesting loons. It varies from year to year.
Loons still on the Quabbin.

Here are a couple of loons that haven't left for the ocean yet. Loons have the ability to live on both fresh and salt waters. Usually the adults leave in early December for the coast and the 6 month old chicks leave soon after.  These 2 evidently did get the memo!  1/15/16

I personally make sure every loon raft is comfortable for our nesting loons the coming summer. Its a tough job and takes a tough man to complete the checklist of demands the loons require for a full nesting season. We launch about 8 rafts at Quabbin each year.  Here I am in action in my breeding plumage testing one of the loon rafts last Friday.  :)   

The common loons are getting settled in to their territories and flying about. Here is a banded pair of loons.  You can see the research bands on each loon on their 2 legs. From thse bands we gain lots of knowledge about their past including where they nest at Quabbin. 4/20/16

The Quabbin loon population is coming back to their territories and will be mating in early May. Last year was a record year with 16 loon chicks successfully fledging and making it until September 1st. This was taken this morning on April 19th, 2016.

Today I found both of the Prescott Brook loons on their territory at the Quabbin Reservoir ready for the summer chick rearing season.  Very seldom does this pair of loons successfully raise any chicks.  4/28/16

Here is a sight that you wont see very often.  Loons out of water!  Loons spend 99% of their life in water.  Today I saw this pair of loons mating on this small island.  The other time on land is setting on the nest.  Note the research bands on the leg of the loon on the left.  5/5/16

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